Wednesday, September 3, 2014
jeannepompadour:

Victorian boots, 1890s

jeannepompadour:

Victorian boots, 1890s

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

geekygothgirl:

I thought this was going to infuriate me by reminding me how much Victorian morailty sucked for women but instead it became the BEST THING EVER. 

Wednesday, January 15, 2014
femmedandy:

theblacklacedandy:

Oh I want this outfit!

Life goals.

femmedandy:

theblacklacedandy:

Oh I want this outfit!

Life goals.

(Source: mariasvarela)

Saturday, December 28, 2013

pic of me and typhonatemybaby arguing over who gets to read which transmetropolitan comic during lunch

(Source: wahnwitzig)

Friday, December 6, 2013
typhonatemybaby:

bel-desconneau what was that you were saying about late victorian porn being weird as fuck?

typhonatemybaby:

bel-desconneau what was that you were saying about late victorian porn being weird as fuck?

Thursday, July 25, 2013 Friday, March 15, 2013

3liza:

weirdvintage:

Polaire was the stage name used by French singer and actress Émilie Marie Bouchaud (May 14, 1874 – October 14, 1939).  She was a tightlacer whose corsetted waist was usually no greater than 14 inches.

Not really.  Note the obvious and crescent-shaped retouching mark on the right image, and then the left isn’t real convincing either, mostly because the edge is too smooth.  Retouching is as old as photography, and the Victorians/Edwardians used to alter actresses and models by scratching or painting the plate (that’s where the word “airbrushing” comes from; they started using airbrushes a little later) as much as we do today.  Same as it ever was.

There’s a limit to tightlacing. The smallest you can POSSIBLY get still has to include space for your spine, an intestine, and some flesh (plus the bulk of the corset). You can get to 14 inches from long-term tightlacing, but I don’t think it looks like this picture?

Monday, March 4, 2013 Sunday, March 3, 2013
I can’t authorize his going without his being prepped.”
“Fine,” Mr. Dunworthy said. “Darwin, Disraeli, the Indian question, Alice in Wonderland, Little Nell, Turner, Tennyson, Three Men in a Boat, crinolines, croquet—”
“Penwipers,” I said.
“Penwipers, crocheted antimacassars, hair wreaths, Prince Albert, Flush, frock coats, sexual repression, Ruskin, Fagin, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, George Bernard Shaw, Gladstone, Galsworthy, Gothic Revival, Gilbert and Sullivan, lawn tennis, and parasols. There,” he said to the seraphim. “He’s been prepped.

Connie Willis, To Say Nothing of the Dog (via arrowsforpens)

i ordered this book purely based on this amazing description of how to prepare for time travel.