Friday, March 7, 2014
blastedheath:

Stephen Seymour Thomas (American, 1868-1956), The Violin Student, Paris, 1891. Oil on canvas, 47.5 x 39 in.

blastedheath:

Stephen Seymour Thomas (American, 1868-1956), The Violin Student, Paris, 1891. Oil on canvas, 47.5 x 39 in.

(Source: fleurdulys)

Sunday, February 9, 2014
mrshorowietzky:

brettholmes:

An awesome publicity shot with Burke!Watson.
That’s a Hansom cab, also called a “two wheeler.” Just a little bit of trivia for ya. ;)

*swoons over the cabdriver*

mrshorowietzky:

brettholmes:

An awesome publicity shot with Burke!Watson.

That’s a Hansom cab, also called a “two wheeler.” Just a little bit of trivia for ya. ;)

*swoons over the cabdriver*

Monday, February 3, 2014

Masterlist of Sherlock season 3 meta/review posts.

I know some people have been avoiding Sherlock spoilers until the third season aired in the US, so here’s a list of the meta and reviews I wrote when it was airing in the UK:

3x01 review:The Empty Hearse

3x02 review:The Sign of Three

3x03 review: "His Last Vow" Part 1, Part 2 (female characters), and Part 3.

Postscript to “His Last Vow”: What if Sherlock faced the consequences of his actions?

Plus a couple of my Daily Dot articles: Fangirl showdown: “After two years, was the new Sherlock worth the wait?" and How Steven Moffat & Mark Gatiss erased the most important female character in “His Last Vow.” 

Tumblr askbox meta: “Why did you think episode 3 of Sherlock was misogynistic?" and its followup, a breakdown of male vs female character roles throughout the series.

Saturday, January 25, 2014

marielikestodraw:

Pretty much one of the best scenes on TV this year, I will fight you on this, kangaroo punches style.

(Source: stelmarias)

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Dead man’s switch. Sure, Magnussen could store all his blackmail information in his head, but for practical purposes it’s stupid to think that he only relied on his Mind Palace. Particularly when keeping hard copies of his blackmail files is perfect insurance against, say, people trying to shoot him in the head. THIS IS BASIC BLACKMAIL SHIT, GUYS. Someone as clever and well-prepared as Magnussen should have kept a bunch of files on hand to be released via automated email, in the event that he was killed or kidnapped.

Ideal opening scene for season four: Britain is in disarray after a vast amount of secret government files and shocking personal information about public figures was all simultaneously leaked online following Magnussen’s death, like a tabloid scandal version of Wikileaks. Everything is utter chaos, and it’s all Sherlock’s fault for shooting first and asking questions later. — What if Sherlock faced the consequences of his actions?

Monday, January 20, 2014

What if Sherlock faced the consequences of his actions?

I’ve been thinking about the kind of storylines Sherlock could have included this season, if they’d decided to follow events through to their natural end. Sherlock shot a man in the head in front of multiple witnesses, so either he needs to face legal consequences or there needs to be a seriously good explanation for how Mycroft prevents this from happening.

  • Cover-up. This is presumably what will happen in canon, since Sherlock’s only punishment was Mycroft unofficially shipping him off to Eastern Europe. I assume that Mycroft’s footsoldiers are all bound by confidentiality laws and couldn’t tell anyone about what they saw, but Magnussen’s private guards and household staff are another matter entirely. How did Mycroft explain Magnussen’s death, anyway? He’s a very public figure, after all. And while many powerful people would almost certainly benefit from Magnussen’s death, it would still be a major news story, even if they went the route of faking a plane crash or natural death.
  • Actual jail time. Sherlock killed a guy. He goes to court, explains the situation, and is sent to jail. He gets a lenient sentence because the judge was one of Magnussen’s blackmail victims, but he’s still gonna be incarcerated for a couple of years. In the meantime, John and Mary have cool adventures with Lestrade, and visit Sherlock regularly in jail so he can get to know the new baby. He assists in their investigations from behind bars, Hannibal-style, and reconstructs crime scenes inside his Mind Palace. They can even include a chase sequence where he “runs” alongside John, predicting where he’s going to go while tracking down a criminal! Totally awesome. The season ends with him being release from jail, ready to start afresh in season 5. [READ MORE]

A couple of readers mentioned to me last week that technically, Sherlock was “punished” for Magnussen’s murder, in that his assignment in Eastern Europe was implied to be a death sentence. But the fact is that this potential storyline is erased within minutes. Sherlock may accept Mycroft’s legally ambiguous banishment, but it’s immediately cut short. The narrative saves him from having to go through any kind of real personal difficulty, which effectively removes most of the power of Magnussen’s inevitable demise.

It could have been a classic story: Sherlock commits to killing Magnussen because he knows it’s the only way to defeat him, but he also knows that by killing Magnussen, he has to make a sacrifice. Specifically, the sacrifice of his freedom and reputation, which he only just got back. The result of removing that sacrifice from the equation is that the act of killing Magnussen comes across as just another example of Sherlock’s arrogance. — What if Sherlock faced the consequences of his actions?

Saturday, January 18, 2014 Thursday, January 16, 2014 Wednesday, January 15, 2014