Saturday, March 22, 2014

GLASGOW TUMBLR/TWITTER MEETUP: TONIGHT! (Saturday March 22, 8pm)

One last post to help spread the word!

Whenever I see Tumblr/fandom meetups online, they’re always in places like London or NYC. So I decided to organize one for Scottish people myself, and you’re all invited! :)

WHEN: 8pm, Saturday March 22, 2014.

WHERE: Mono, 12 Kings Court, Glasgow.

Mono is a cool vegetarian cafe/bar. Closest train stations: Argyle Street and Glasgow Central.

WHO: Tumblr people! Fandom people! People from the Internet! Someone already messaged to ask if everyone would already know each other, and the answer is NO. This is a public event, so ~people from the internet~ can hang out IRL. Me and gracierocket are already friends, but aside from that, I expect most of us will be strangers. You can always bring someone along if you feel nervous! :)

A bunch of people have already RSVP’d, but since it’s happening tonight, there’s no need for anyone else to message me or anything — just show up! :) My Twitter is @Hello_Tailor if you have troouble finding the bar or whatever. I’ll be at a big table, and am a woman with curly brown hair and black-framed glasses.

Monday, March 17, 2014

GLASGOW TUMBLR MEETUP, SATURDAY 22nd MARCH, 8pm.

A bunch of people seemed interested in the idea of a Tumblr/Twitter/fandom meetup in Glasgow, so here we go!

WHEN: 8pm, Saturday March 22, 2014.

WHERE: Mono, 12 Kings Court, Glasgow.

Mono is a cool vegetarian cafe/bar, and there isn’t a band playing on Saturday night so it shouldn’t be too loud. Closest train stations: Argyle Street and Glasgow Central.

WHO: Tumblr people! Fandom people! People from the Internet! A couple of you already messaged to ask if it’d all be people who know each other already or something, and the answer is NO. This is a public event, so people from Tumblr/fandom can hang out IRL. Me and gracierocket are already friends, but aside from that, I expect most people will be strangers. You can always bring someone along if you feel nervous! :)

I’ll be reblogging this once a day for the next week to make sure everyone sees it. Please reblog this post if you want to signal boost it to any Scottish friends! :)

If you want to come along, please RSVP with a reply or send me an askbox message so I know how many people are gonna show up!

?

Sunday, March 16, 2014
The Ministry of Defence (MoD) has submitted plans for the Faslane naval dockyard to pour more liquid waste into the Gareloch as the number of UK nuclear subs based there rises from five to 14 by 2019. The waste comes from the subs’ reactors and includes radioactive cobalt-60 and tritium. Casual reminder that the UK government stores nuclear submarines as far away from London as possible, right next to Glasgow, a city that conveniently houses pretty much zero Conservative voters, meaning that our opinions aren’t really relevent. Now they want to dump a bunch of nuclear waste into part of the Clyde, ie the river that runs through the middle of Glasgow itself. I can’t imagine why people are campaigning for Scottish independence.
Wednesday, February 5, 2014 Saturday, January 18, 2014
fursasaida:

typhonatemybaby:

fursasaida:

frozenrevolutionary:

internalfrontierseternalidealist:

frozenrevolutionary:

This is the greatest thing I’ve seen in a long time.

Great Britain and its politics never fails to amuse.

Sometimes I get sad.  Then this comes across my dash again.

 

despite the fact that I loathe frankie Boyle, I can confirm that the main argument in favour of Scottish independence/devolution is that we’ll get the power to empty Loch Lomond and flood the southern tyrants in a torrent vengeance for the 700 years of injustices suffered by Caledonia and her folk.Cant wait for the Barricades made of half filled Irn Bru and Buckfast bottles to be erected in Glasgow city centre to defend the freedom of the north.

excellent. this is precisely the confirmation i was seeking. i look forward to scotland’s dystopian knitwear.

fursasaida:

typhonatemybaby:

fursasaida:

frozenrevolutionary:

internalfrontierseternalidealist:

frozenrevolutionary:

This is the greatest thing I’ve seen in a long time.

Great Britain and its politics never fails to amuse.

Sometimes I get sad.  Then this comes across my dash again.

 

despite the fact that I loathe frankie Boyle, I can confirm that the main argument in favour of Scottish independence/devolution is that we’ll get the power to empty Loch Lomond and flood the southern tyrants in a torrent vengeance for the 700 years of injustices suffered by Caledonia and her folk.

Cant wait for the Barricades made of half filled Irn Bru and Buckfast bottles to be erected in Glasgow city centre to defend the freedom of the north.

excellent. this is precisely the confirmation i was seeking. i look forward to scotland’s dystopian knitwear.

(Source: paxamericana)

Thursday, January 9, 2014
oh-glasgow:

"Imagine the Scottish Independence debate was in reverse."
Excellent points.

oh-glasgow:

"Imagine the Scottish Independence debate was in reverse."

Excellent points.

Monday, December 23, 2013

bloggirlonfilm:

Tilda Swinton by Karl Lagerfeld. CHANEL Paris-Ediburgh AD Campaign. 2013

(Source: )

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Anonymous asked: come join Scandinavia, Scotland! we'd love to have you!

PLEASE. I WOULD LOVE THIS.

Anonymous asked: so I hear Scotland's taking a vote on independence from GB next summer. just curious--how do you hope it goes?

oh god what a question. i mean if the current polls are anything to go by, we are not going to be independent anyway. when i checked last week, it was something like 25% pro-indie, 40% anti, and 35% undecided? basically, they really need to step up the information campaign because nobody knows what is going on, the publicity for the vote is terrible so far, and whenever ANYONE talks about it IRL, it’s accompanied with a kind of long-suffering groan. from both sides. at this rate, the voter turnout is gonna be SO LOW. which is kinda ridiculous, considering how much most scottish people hate being ruled by  “”the english”“.

as far as i’ve heard so far, most of the reasons why people are anti-independence boil down to fear or lack of info. there aren’t really a great many people in scotland who are, like, “pro-westminster” in a serious way, because the current uk government is so un-representative of scottish politics. pretty much nobody in scotland votes tory, for example. NOBODY. although obviously there are a bunch of people who are british unionists just, you know, because. because of reasons. or because they’re hoping the next government will be better/more representative.

i am not all that well-informed (at the moment), but most of the anti-indie arguments are stuff like, “Will we be allowed back into the EU?” and “Will we be able to afford anything without England’s money?” of course, in many many many ways, scotland habitually gets shafted by the current government, because they know we won’t be voting for them anyway so there’s no reason to cater to all the poor and/or left-wing people up north. there are also a whole bunch of other questions that people like to toss around as if they’re super confusing (WOULD WE KEEP THE POUND? yes. WOULD THERE BE PASSPORT CHECKS AT THE BORDERS?? no.) but that’s basically just indicative of the fact tht no one knows what is going on. people are confused and irritated by the clumsy messages coming from the pro-indie campaign, and i suspect a lot of anti-independence people aren’t really “pro-westminster” so much as scared of an uncertain future. it’s all a shambles tbh.

Wednesday, December 11, 2013
mugglepolitics:

utcjonesobservatory:

Peter Higgs: I Wouldn’t Be Productive Enough For Today’s Academic System: 

Peter Higgs: ‘Today I wouldn’t get an academic job. It’s as simple as that’. Photograph: David Levene for the Guardian


Peter Higgs, the British physicist who gave his name to the Higgs boson, believes no university would employ him in today’s academic system because he would not be considered “productive” enough.
The emeritus professor at Edinburgh University, who says he has never sent an email, browsed the internet or even made a mobile phone call, published fewer than 10 papers after his groundbreaking work, which identified the mechanism by which subatomic material acquires mass, was published in 1964.
He doubts a similar breakthrough could be achieved in today’s academic culture, because of the expectations on academics to collaborate and keep churning out papers. He said: “It’s difficult to imagine how I would ever have enough peace and quiet in the present sort of climate to do what I did in 1964.”
Speaking to the Guardian en route to Stockholm to receive the 2013 Nobel prize for science, Higgs, 84, said he would almost certainly have been sacked had he not been nominated for the Nobel in 1980.
Edinburgh University’s authorities then took the view, he later learned, that he “might get a Nobel prize – and if he doesn’t we can always get rid of him”.
Higgs said he became “an embarrassment to the department when they did research assessment exercises”. A message would go around the department saying: “Please give a list of your recent publications.” Higgs said: “I would send back a statement: ‘None.’ “
By the time he retired in 1996, he was uncomfortable with the new academic culture. “After I retired it was quite a long time before I went back to my department. I thought I was well out of it. It wasn’t my way of doing things any more. Today I wouldn’t get an academic job. It’s as simple as that. I don’t think I would be regarded as productive enough.”
Higgs revealed that his career had also been jeopardised by his disagreements in the 1960s and 70s with the then principal, Michael Swann, who went on to chair the BBC. Higgs objected to Swann’s handling of student protests and to the university’s shareholdings in South African companies during the apartheid regime. “[Swann] didn’t understand the issues, and denounced the student leaders.”
He regrets that the particle he identified in 1964 became known as the “God particle”.
He said: “Some people get confused between the science and the theology. They claim that what happened at Cern proves the existence of God.”
An atheist since the age of 10, he fears the nickname “reinforces confused thinking in the heads of people who are already thinking in a confused way. If they believe that story about creation in seven days, are they being intelligent?”
He also revealed that he turned down a knighthood in 1999. “I’m rather cynical about the way the honours system is used, frankly. A whole lot of the honours system is used for political purposes by the government in power.”
He has not yet decided which way he will vote in the referendum onScottish independence. “My attitude would depend a little bit on how much progress the lunatic right of the Conservative party makes in trying to get us out of Europe. If the UK were threatening to withdraw from Europe, I would certainly want Scotland to be out of that.”
He has never been tempted to buy a television, but was persuaded to watch The Big Bang Theory last year, and said he wasn’t impressed.


Every line of this was mind-boggling and engaging.

Peter Higgs is so awesome.

mugglepolitics:

utcjonesobservatory:

Peter Higgs: I Wouldn’t Be Productive Enough For Today’s Academic System: 

Peter Higgs: ‘Today I wouldn’t get an academic job. It’s as simple as that’. Photograph: David Levene for the Guardian

Peter Higgs, the British physicist who gave his name to the Higgs boson, believes no university would employ him in today’s academic system because he would not be considered “productive” enough.

The emeritus professor at Edinburgh University, who says he has never sent an email, browsed the internet or even made a mobile phone call, published fewer than 10 papers after his groundbreaking work, which identified the mechanism by which subatomic material acquires mass, was published in 1964.

He doubts a similar breakthrough could be achieved in today’s academic culture, because of the expectations on academics to collaborate and keep churning out papers. He said: “It’s difficult to imagine how I would ever have enough peace and quiet in the present sort of climate to do what I did in 1964.”

Speaking to the Guardian en route to Stockholm to receive the 2013 Nobel prize for science, Higgs, 84, said he would almost certainly have been sacked had he not been nominated for the Nobel in 1980.

Edinburgh University’s authorities then took the view, he later learned, that he “might get a Nobel prize – and if he doesn’t we can always get rid of him”.

Higgs said he became “an embarrassment to the department when they did research assessment exercises”. A message would go around the department saying: “Please give a list of your recent publications.” Higgs said: “I would send back a statement: ‘None.’ “

By the time he retired in 1996, he was uncomfortable with the new academic culture. “After I retired it was quite a long time before I went back to my department. I thought I was well out of it. It wasn’t my way of doing things any more. Today I wouldn’t get an academic job. It’s as simple as that. I don’t think I would be regarded as productive enough.”

Higgs revealed that his career had also been jeopardised by his disagreements in the 1960s and 70s with the then principal, Michael Swann, who went on to chair the BBC. Higgs objected to Swann’s handling of student protests and to the university’s shareholdings in South African companies during the apartheid regime. “[Swann] didn’t understand the issues, and denounced the student leaders.”

He regrets that the particle he identified in 1964 became known as the “God particle”.

He said: “Some people get confused between the science and the theology. They claim that what happened at Cern proves the existence of God.”

An atheist since the age of 10, he fears the nickname “reinforces confused thinking in the heads of people who are already thinking in a confused way. If they believe that story about creation in seven days, are they being intelligent?”

He also revealed that he turned down a knighthood in 1999. “I’m rather cynical about the way the honours system is used, frankly. A whole lot of the honours system is used for political purposes by the government in power.”

He has not yet decided which way he will vote in the referendum onScottish independence. “My attitude would depend a little bit on how much progress the lunatic right of the Conservative party makes in trying to get us out of Europe. If the UK were threatening to withdraw from Europe, I would certainly want Scotland to be out of that.”

He has never been tempted to buy a television, but was persuaded to watch The Big Bang Theory last year, and said he wasn’t impressed.

Every line of this was mind-boggling and engaging.

Peter Higgs is so awesome.