Monday, September 1, 2014
seaghostsoaring:

Sebastian Droste (1892-1927) was a poet, actor and dancer connected with the gay and underworld subcultures of Berlin in the 1920s. In 1922, Droste married expressionist exotic dancer and actress in German silent movies, Anita Berber (1899–1928). Scandalously androgynous, she wore heavy dancer’s make-up, which on the black-and-white photos and films of the time came across as jet black lipstick painted across the heart-shaped part of her skinny lips, and charcoaled eyes. Her performances broke boundaries with their androgyny and total nudity, but it was her public appearances that really challenged taboos. Berber’s overt drug addiction and bisexuality were matters of public chatter. In addition to her addiction to cocaine, opium and morphine, one of Berber’s favourites was chloroform and ether mixed in a bowl. This would be stirred with a white rose, the petals of which she would then eat

seaghostsoaring:

Sebastian Droste (1892-1927) was a poet, actor and dancer connected with the gay and underworld subcultures of Berlin in the 1920s. In 1922, Droste married expressionist exotic dancer and actress in German silent movies, Anita Berber (1899–1928). Scandalously androgynous, she wore heavy dancer’s make-up, which on the black-and-white photos and films of the time came across as jet black lipstick painted across the heart-shaped part of her skinny lips, and charcoaled eyes.

Her performances broke boundaries with their androgyny and total nudity, but it was her public appearances that really challenged taboos. Berber’s overt drug addiction and bisexuality were matters of public chatter. In addition to her addiction to cocaine, opium and morphine, one of Berber’s favourites was chloroform and ether mixed in a bowl. This would be stirred with a white rose, the petals of which she would then eat

Saturday, August 30, 2014
morgan-leigh:


In fact, in these films it seems that women are, by and large, the only ones likely to find themselves in serious physical peril. Peril is, of course, the default state for women everywhere: it is such a natural facet of our existence that many of us forget that it is something we are always experiencing. But we are. And the culture is here to helpfully remind us of that fact on a near-constant basis: why, after, develop a complex story arc for a female character when you can simply show her being raped instead? Or, alternatively, kill her off to make a man sad: this summer’s The Amazing Spider-Man 2 did actually kill off a major character who was not a villain, but that was Gwen Stacy, Peter Parker’s girlfriend. Just about the entire collected oeuvre of Christopher Nolan features plotlines of this nature, from Memento to Inception to The Dark Knight.
[…]
But what does it mean for the cinematic landscape to be without peril? On television, women are still raped and murdered in depressingly disproportionate numbers (ahem, True Detective and basically every other crime show ever to be on air), but whatever the substantial flaws of, say, Game of Thrones in this area, there’s no denying that the show’s mortality rate is high across the board. Even The Good Wife, not a program known for this sort of thing, killed off a character to great effect this year. But on the big screen, when it comes to big entertainment—discounting, of course, horror, in which danger and violence are so manufactured and processed that they become some other product entirely—fear is gone. Everybody must stick to the formula. And the formula is that the heroes defeat the villains, and the world is saved, and if there are consequences they are manageable and positive. And always, always, there will be sequels.

Summer Movie Season in Review: In which I discuss Captain America, Guardians of the Galaxy, Snowpiercer, and the fact that nobody ever dies at the movies anymore.

morgan-leigh:

In fact, in these films it seems that women are, by and large, the only ones likely to find themselves in serious physical peril. Peril is, of course, the default state for women everywhere: it is such a natural facet of our existence that many of us forget that it is something we are always experiencing. But we are. And the culture is here to helpfully remind us of that fact on a near-constant basis: why, after, develop a complex story arc for a female character when you can simply show her being raped instead? Or, alternatively, kill her off to make a man sad: this summer’s The Amazing Spider-Man 2 did actually kill off a major character who was not a villain, but that was Gwen Stacy, Peter Parker’s girlfriend. Just about the entire collected oeuvre of Christopher Nolan features plotlines of this nature, from Memento to Inception to The Dark Knight.

[…]

But what does it mean for the cinematic landscape to be without peril? On television, women are still raped and murdered in depressingly disproportionate numbers (ahem, True Detective and basically every other crime show ever to be on air), but whatever the substantial flaws of, say, Game of Thrones in this area, there’s no denying that the show’s mortality rate is high across the board. Even The Good Wife, not a program known for this sort of thing, killed off a character to great effect this year. But on the big screen, when it comes to big entertainment—discounting, of course, horror, in which danger and violence are so manufactured and processed that they become some other product entirely—fear is gone. Everybody must stick to the formula. And the formula is that the heroes defeat the villains, and the world is saved, and if there are consequences they are manageable and positive. And always, always, there will be sequels.

Summer Movie Season in Review: In which I discuss Captain America, Guardians of the Galaxy, Snowpiercer, and the fact that nobody ever dies at the movies anymore.

Wednesday, August 27, 2014
johndarnielle:

ronaldcmerchant:

the OILY MANIAC (1975)

in retrospect, it’s clear that horror film titles had nowhere to go but down after THE OILY MANIAC

johndarnielle:

ronaldcmerchant:

the OILY MANIAC (1975)

in retrospect, it’s clear that horror film titles had nowhere to go but down after THE OILY MANIAC

Saturday, August 23, 2014

pinstripesuit:

thrashedreality:

The lovely Heroic Trio.

so after stumbling across an article about this movie on Deadspin yesterday, I decided to check it out (it’s on Netflix!), and it is indeed the greatest thing ever created (brief summary: all-lady superhero Hong Kong action movie from the 90’s)

also this is such a @hellotailor movie srsly go watch this now

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

febricant:

sams-film-stills:

Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (2010) Lucas Lee Posters Dir. Edgar Wright

The terrible secret is that I’d watch all of these

I’d watch all of these, AND I’m disgusted that none of us remembered to reference any of them in Steve Rogers At 100.

Sunday, August 10, 2014

ofgeography:

so here’s a fun story about this movie. guess who loves this movie? me! i do! i love this movie. i love this movie so much that when i was in the 7th grade and i saw “first wives club 2” on pay per view i was like: HELL YEAH!! FIRST WIVES CLUB TWO!! NO ONE TOLD ME THERE WAS A SEQUEL!!!

here’s the synopsis for first wives club 2:

disgruntled first wives take their ex-husbands’ new lovers under their wing.

sounds great, right? awesome viewing material for a precocious 11-year-old.

so i buy this movie, and like, three minutes into it i’m starting to feel suspicious?? like it’s really low quality and my girls are nowhere in sight?? how come none of the first wives are the same?? how come they’re alone in a bedroom with mood lighting?? why is she taking off her shirt?? why are they both taking off their shirts?? WHY ARE THEY—

here’s what i did not know about first wives club 2:

  • it is a lesbian porno of no relation to the beloved 1996 classic.

so of course i, horrified that i’ve accidentally bought porn on my family’s account (and in that state of panic that kids work themselves into whenever anything regarding sex is mentioned), quickly shut off the TV and go upstairs and watch an episode of veggie tales to like, cleanse my soul and apologize to jesus, and that’s that.

EXCEPT, OF COURSE:

  • you have to pay for pay per view.

so the end of the month comes and i have completely put this incident out of my mind, haha, i accidentally bought porn, how funny, TELL NO ONE. right? and i’m sitting at a nice dinner with my mother, my stepfather, and my very religious aunt deb, and we’re just talking about farm things, whatever, when suddenly my mother puts her fork down and says, “okay, there’s something we need to discuss. as a family.”

  • AS A FAMILY.

and i’m like, running through a list of people i know who could conceivably be dead, and fantasizing about my mother announcing that she’s going to buy me My Own Computer Just Because U Earned It Kiddo, and she pulls out a piece of paper that says DIRECTV across the top. and i’m like: OH NO.

"i received the tv bill today," my mother said, and i was like, shoveling potatoes into my mouth as fast as i could because i knew that when i went to PORN PRISON they weren’t going to feed me this kind of quality starch. "does anybody want to tell me who purchased the pornography?"

as a reminder, a quick table survey:

  • my mother, surprised and disappointed by the porn bill (innocent)
  • my stepfather, a grumbly old cowboy who just wants to sing along to kenny chesney and watch the hunt for red october (innocent)
  • my aunt deb, a super religious catholic whose best friend is a nun named Sister Placid (innocent)
  • me, the 11-year-old with a mouthful of potatoes who definitely purchased the lesbian pornography

silence.

my mother said, “i’m not going to ask again.”

silence.

my aunt looked at my stepdad. my stepdad looked at my aunt. NOBODY LOOKED AT ME, THE 11-YEAR-OLD WITH A MOUTHFUL OF POTATOES WHO DEFINITELY PURCHASED THE LESBIAN PORNOGRAPHY.

my mother shook her head and put the bill down. “this was incredibly inappropriate,” she said. “skip, deb, whoever. buy that shit on your own time. i’m not paying for it. what if molly had seen it?”

  • WHAT IF MOLLY HAD SEEN IT?

"don’t expose my kid to that crap."

  • DON’T
  • EXPOSE
  • MY KID
  • TO THAT CRAP

"if you want to watch porn, fine, but do it in private and don’t expect me to pay for it. i can’t believe one of you did that in the living room."

  • I CAN’T BELIEVE ONE OF YOU DID THAT
  • IN THE LIVING ROOM

but molly, why didn’t you own up to it and explain that it was an accident?

  • are you fucking kidding
  • i did not want to go to porn prison

the fun conclusion to this story is that i never owned up to it, which means that there are 3 people in the world who have not solved the mystery of the lesbian porn. a quick survey:

  • my mother, who lives every day wondering whose porn she paid for
  • my stepfather, who probably wishes he knew less about his wife’s sister’s porn preferences
  • my aunt, who probably wishes she knew less about her sister’s husband’s porn preferences

but molly, why don’t you own up to it now, with the safety of time and distance and the knowledge that porn prison isn’t real?

  • are you fucking kidding
  • this is the best thing i’ve ever done

(Source: bellecs)

Friday, August 8, 2014
interweber:

Sorry!

interweber:

Sorry!

Sunday, August 3, 2014
Con Air director Simon West made passing mention recently that he’d be up for directing a sequel to the vastly underrated marathon of ridiculousness, but only if “it was completely turned on its head. Con Air In Space, for example. A studio version where they’re all robots or the convicts are reanimated as super-convicts, or where the good guys are bad guys and the bad guys are good guys.” In news more likely to actually happen, West—whose credits also include Rick Astley’s “Never Gonna Give You Up” video, Con Air director considers a sequel (in space), works on a new TV show with The Who · Newswire · The A.V. Club (via 3liza)
Saturday, August 2, 2014

obscuruslupa:

mari-on-tea:

bigbardafree:

djtetsuo89:

danistotallyuncool:

gatoishwary:

ttripod:

jodyrobots:

whaa

WHATS THIS MOVIE!?

I WISH I KNEW!!!

The name of this movie is Top Secret

Dude, top secret is such a good movie.

this movie has an entire bar fight sequence that takes place underwater

for no reason at all

next date night movie

The boots killed me.

(Source: anitial-deez)

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

fuckyeahthescarletwitch:

Female-lead action movies just don’t sell.