Thursday, April 24, 2014

magnusatom:

The artists over at Pictoplasma academy are producing some pretty amazing stuff.

Saturday, April 19, 2014

cthonical:

captainhanni:

sighs @ own self

THIS IS SO CUTEADORABLEPERF SOMEBODY WRITE ME THIS STORY NOW PLZ

Wednesday, April 16, 2014
mojoverne:

 
Sunday, March 30, 2014

cthonical:

professorfangirl:

hannibal4all:

Metamorphosis - Bryan Fuller’s inspiration for Will’s transformation.

Starring Anna Friel, Ed Speleers

Stunning.

an adaptation of the myth about the goddess diana/artemis punishing the young man who stumbles on her bathing naked.

with body horror. and cannibalism.

whaaaat, this is brilliant.

(Source: vimeo.com)

Friday, March 28, 2014

boardingtheark:

dragonlord132 answered: 1.Excellent! 2: This site needs more actor swap Hannibal. Mads as WIll and Hugh as Hanni

fucking hell, my shoulders are dead after this X_X

My original intend was very different (and much more…innocent?) for this request, but then my mind literally went on a field trip with it and THIS happened   щ(ºДºщ)  lot’s of mindfuckery, really. (I gues I rather switched Will with Hannibal instead Mads with Hugh. Sorry…  ._.”)

STILL- It was tremendous fun but also a very big challenge- thanx for this inspiring request!! And as you can see- I couldn’t withstand and make a second version with raven!Will ~ 

typhonatemybaby:

charminglyantiquated:

Classic and Reverse harpies, mermaids, centaurs, and nagas

as a species we have this habit of tacking human faces onto animals and when you think about it, it looks kind of stupid, but it looks even stupider backwards

so

"look at the legs on that bird"

Thursday, March 27, 2014

When her kiss transforms the Beast, she is furious.

"You should have warned me! Here I was smitten by an exceptional being, and all of a sudden, my fiance becomes an ordinary distinguished young man!"

the 1909 play Beauty and the Beast:  Fantasy in Two Acts by Fernand Noziere, the very first published version of the story where the Beauty is disappointed when the Beast transforms into a human at the end. (via corseque)

cc: cthonical

gothiccharmschool:

lmnpnch:

I had wings once. They were strong. They were stolen from me.

Please let this movie be good. Please.

Wednesday, March 19, 2014
clive-gershwin-palmer:

minas—morgul:

"Globster" is a technical term used by cryptozoologists to refer to mysterious carcasses that originate in a watery environment. Mostly, globsters come from the ocean, though some are found on lake or river shores, or even in the stomachs of dead whales. By definition, globsters are hard to identify. If it is easily identified as a known animal, then it isn’t a globster. Locals and the uneducated are often convinced that they have a sea serpentcarcass on their hands (unless the thing has tentacles, in which case it is often labeled as a giant squid or a giant octopus). A large proportion of all globsters are ultimately identified by experts as basking shark carcasses. Basking sharks assume a plesiosaur-like shape when they reach a certain stage of decomposition. Those globsters that don’t get labeled as basking sharks are often highly controversial and can resist identification, causing the experts to fight with each other about what it really is.
However, even those globsters that are identified as basking sharks can still be quite mysterious. A number of these have weird features that seem incompatible with the basking shark hypothesis, and many well-documented examples have been far larger than any species of shark is supposed to get. This naturally leads to the idea that there may yet be undiscovered species of truly gigantic sharks out there, even if the world’s oceans do not contain any sea serpents.
With some globsters, the official diagnosis seems particularly lacking, as if scientists are so uncomfortable with the unknown that they prefer to put the wrong label on something rather than admit they don’t know what it is. One globster that seems to exemplify this process is the “dry harbor carcass” that washed onto an Alaskan beach in 1956. It was about 100 feet long and covered all over in reddish fur about 2 inches long. This globster was officially declared to be a dead Baird’s beaked whale, in direct contradiction to its coat of fur and its length (Baird’s beaked whales are not known to reach more than 42 feet in length, and do not have fur).
Some researchers think that the most puzzling globsters represent extinct prehistoric animals that were preserved in ice, then later washed out to sea in icebergs and released through thawing. This is an interesting idea, but so far it has not been confirmed. If it were true, you would expect that land animals would be more heavily represented, but nearly all globsters appear to be aquatic creatures. Of course, it might also be that people are more likely to interpret something as an aquatic creature if it washes up on a shore, and, if it is rotten enough, it might be hard to decide whether it has legs or paddles. Strangely, the idea that globsters are really unfrozen prehistoric animals has been used by some scientists to justify an attitude of having no interest whatsoever in globsters, when, in fact, the carcass of a mammoth or some other prehistoric creature is normally an object of intense scientific interest.

clive-gershwin-palmer:

minas—morgul:

"Globster" is a technical term used by cryptozoologists to refer to mysterious carcasses that originate in a watery environment. Mostly, globsters come from the ocean, though some are found on lake or river shores, or even in the stomachs of dead whales. By definition, globsters are hard to identify. If it is easily identified as a known animal, then it isn’t a globster. Locals and the uneducated are often convinced that they have a sea serpentcarcass on their hands (unless the thing has tentacles, in which case it is often labeled as a giant squid or a giant octopus). A large proportion of all globsters are ultimately identified by experts as basking shark carcasses. Basking sharks assume a plesiosaur-like shape when they reach a certain stage of decomposition. Those globsters that don’t get labeled as basking sharks are often highly controversial and can resist identification, causing the experts to fight with each other about what it really is.

However, even those globsters that are identified as basking sharks can still be quite mysterious. A number of these have weird features that seem incompatible with the basking shark hypothesis, and many well-documented examples have been far larger than any species of shark is supposed to get. This naturally leads to the idea that there may yet be undiscovered species of truly gigantic sharks out there, even if the world’s oceans do not contain any sea serpents.

With some globsters, the official diagnosis seems particularly lacking, as if scientists are so uncomfortable with the unknown that they prefer to put the wrong label on something rather than admit they don’t know what it is. One globster that seems to exemplify this process is the “dry harbor carcass” that washed onto an Alaskan beach in 1956. It was about 100 feet long and covered all over in reddish fur about 2 inches long. This globster was officially declared to be a dead Baird’s beaked whale, in direct contradiction to its coat of fur and its length (Baird’s beaked whales are not known to reach more than 42 feet in length, and do not have fur).

Some researchers think that the most puzzling globsters represent extinct prehistoric animals that were preserved in ice, then later washed out to sea in icebergs and released through thawing. This is an interesting idea, but so far it has not been confirmed. If it were true, you would expect that land animals would be more heavily represented, but nearly all globsters appear to be aquatic creatures. Of course, it might also be that people are more likely to interpret something as an aquatic creature if it washes up on a shore, and, if it is rotten enough, it might be hard to decide whether it has legs or paddles. Strangely, the idea that globsters are really unfrozen prehistoric animals has been used by some scientists to justify an attitude of having no interest whatsoever in globsters, when, in fact, the carcass of a mammoth or some other prehistoric creature is normally an object of intense scientific interest.