Monday, April 21, 2014
mapsontheweb:

Map of Roman Britain (150 AD)

mapsontheweb:

Map of Roman Britain (150 AD)

(Source: Wikipedia)

Thursday, April 17, 2014

gaydream-believer:

If you want to understand how Europe really works just remember that when it was first encountered here, syphilis was known as ‘the French disease’ in Italy, Poland and Germany, ‘the Italian disease’ in France, ‘the Spanish disease’ in Poland, ‘the Polish disease’ in Russia and ‘the Christian’ or ‘the Western disease’ in Turkey.

Saturday, April 12, 2014
eleveninches:

hardboiledmeggs:

absentlyabbie:

shinykari:

legete:

haipollai:

ok, idk how easy this is to read but since everyone is discussing dates, i went to the movie to check. this is steve’s rejection from the beginning, his birthday is in the upper right corner and there’s ANOTHEr date in the lower left which I think is supposed to be a today’s date kind of thing and it looks to be June 14 1943
so there we go, steve enlists in mid 1943

#this feels late for bucky to be enlisting #but that isn’t the issue
How interesting that you would mention this, because I’ve recently been thinking he didn’t enlist. His serial number, which he’s heard muttering when Steve comes to rescue him, starts “32557.”
According to this fabulous WWII serial number generator, an enlisted man from New York should have a serial number starting with the numbers “12.”
A New York man with a serial number starting with “32”? Drafted. What we may be dealing with here is a Bucky who didn’t choose to go to war but was instead compelled to do so versus a Steve who is desperate to get in. I think it opens up a lot of different and interesting storylines for the two of them.

There’s been some great meta/discussion about this in the last couple days, which I think is great.

Makes you wonder if Bucky got the draft, and then, knowing how Steve felt about things, told his best buddy he was “enlisting.” Because how do you face this skinny, brave idiot who just won’t stop trying to volunteer that you wouldn’t be going if you didn’t have to?

Based on a VERY FAST speed-read of the Smithsonian panel, which I have yet to see a good screen grab or transcription of, Bucky enlisted in 1941, following Pearl Harbor, which was mentioned specifically in the panel text (could also be 1942, i.e. the winter of ‘41-‘42). I’m reasonably sure it said “enlisted.” It also listed his training base as, I think, a (probably fictional) Camp McCoy? That only stood out because it wasn’t Lehigh, which surprised me. Whether or not that’s right, the answer’s definitely in that panel.

i love fandom

My headcanon all along was that Bucky was drafted rather than enlisted, because that adds Extra Agony to this already agonizing relationship. I like the idea that Bucky was kind of unsuited to combat, so while we tend to think of him as this scrappy streetfighter guy, he was never really a natural soldier in the way that Steve was as soon as he left the USO. In another life, Bucky would’ve wound up in a string of random jobs helping to put Steve through art school, and then he’d get dragged along once Steve started getting more and more involved in local politics and human rights campaigns and stuff because Steve always wanted to chang the world, even if it was right there in NYC. :(((

eleveninches:

hardboiledmeggs:

absentlyabbie:

shinykari:

legete:

haipollai:

ok, idk how easy this is to read but since everyone is discussing dates, i went to the movie to check. this is steve’s rejection from the beginning, his birthday is in the upper right corner and there’s ANOTHEr date in the lower left which I think is supposed to be a today’s date kind of thing and it looks to be June 14 1943

so there we go, steve enlists in mid 1943

#this feels late for bucky to be enlisting #but that isn’t the issue

How interesting that you would mention this, because I’ve recently been thinking he didn’t enlist. His serial number, which he’s heard muttering when Steve comes to rescue him, starts “32557.”

According to this fabulous WWII serial number generator, an enlisted man from New York should have a serial number starting with the numbers “12.”

A New York man with a serial number starting with “32”? Drafted. What we may be dealing with here is a Bucky who didn’t choose to go to war but was instead compelled to do so versus a Steve who is desperate to get in. I think it opens up a lot of different and interesting storylines for the two of them.

There’s been some great meta/discussion about this in the last couple days, which I think is great.

Makes you wonder if Bucky got the draft, and then, knowing how Steve felt about things, told his best buddy he was “enlisting.” Because how do you face this skinny, brave idiot who just won’t stop trying to volunteer that you wouldn’t be going if you didn’t have to?

Based on a VERY FAST speed-read of the Smithsonian panel, which I have yet to see a good screen grab or transcription of, Bucky enlisted in 1941, following Pearl Harbor, which was mentioned specifically in the panel text (could also be 1942, i.e. the winter of ‘41-‘42). I’m reasonably sure it said “enlisted.” It also listed his training base as, I think, a (probably fictional) Camp McCoy? That only stood out because it wasn’t Lehigh, which surprised me. Whether or not that’s right, the answer’s definitely in that panel.

i love fandom

My headcanon all along was that Bucky was drafted rather than enlisted, because that adds Extra Agony to this already agonizing relationship. I like the idea that Bucky was kind of unsuited to combat, so while we tend to think of him as this scrappy streetfighter guy, he was never really a natural soldier in the way that Steve was as soon as he left the USO. In another life, Bucky would’ve wound up in a string of random jobs helping to put Steve through art school, and then he’d get dragged along once Steve started getting more and more involved in local politics and human rights campaigns and stuff because Steve always wanted to chang the world, even if it was right there in NYC. :(((

Thursday, April 3, 2014

jeannlannes asked: top 5 napoleonic battles!

typhonatemybaby:

ladycashasatiger:

joachimmurat:

davoutsglasses:

typhonatemybaby:

davoutsglasses:

typhonatemybaby:

louisnicolasdavout:

  1. Leipzig (I FUCKING LOVE THAT BATTLE, IT’S SO UNDERRATED IT HURTS)
  2. Austerlitz
  3. Krasnoy (for Ney being a total badass)
  4. Jena-Auerstaedt (Davout owning everybody)
  5. Kulm (just because my babe Ostermann-Tostoy lost his arm there)

UGH FINALLY SOMEONE GETS IT ABOUT LEIPZIG. SO HARDCORE. SO BADASS. SO COOL

YEAH, IT’S NOT LIKE IT WAS THE BIGGEST BATTLE UNTIL WWI. EVERYBODY CARES ONLY ABOUT WATERLOO, WHICH WAS LIKE A SKIRMISH COMPARED TO IT!

I like to view Waterloo as the TV movie compared to the multi season epic that was the initial run of 1794-1814.

part of my mad intricate plan to have a massive budget extra long game of thrones/hannibal level quality TV show of that span of history invovles this:

1794-1798= seasons 1 and 2

egyptian campaign+ early consulate years: season 3. finale at Marengo

becomes emperor halfway through season 4. pre season finale episode with battle of trafalgar. season finale with austerlitz.

season 5: mixture of massive german battles at friedland, eylau and jena-auerstadt: massive set piece affairs. thousands of extras. towards the middle of the season the peninsular kicks off.

season 6: largely peninsular shit. bernadotte leaves. napoleon remarries. kind of a soap opera season. lots of tantrums. war of fifth coalition starts at seasons end 

season 7: war of fifth coalition continued from its start at end of season 6 Russia begins to get significant ( alex will have briefly been around for tilsit in one fo the prior seasons), poland etc. more peninsular stuff too. lots of shooting

season 8: russian invasion. bleak as fuck. very depressing. lots of blood and side character death. ends at borodino

season 9: military collapse and retreat. utterly demoralising. all youyr favourite characters have PTSD or are dead. lots of starving peasants. Wellington is going to town in spain meanwhile. badajoz etc. ( or maybe that in season 8? the timelines have to match!) massive set piece battles in grim frozen wildernesses. lots of french guys getting shot in the iberian peninsular. wellesley is a total bitch to everyone.

season 10: first few episodes are final retreat from russia: the prior seasons finale has left the viewer wondering if Ney is dead. until mid season its a frnatic car chase acrss central europe until… MID SEASON FINALE AT LIEPZIG. HUGE BATTLE THOUSANDS OF EXTRAS. PONIATOWSKI DEAD. LOTS OF TEARS. thousands of fans tear their eyes out on tumblr.

season 10: bonaparte suffering protracted psychological collapse as everyone legs it back to france and the english start moving up in the south. lots of angst and crying. season finale has al your faves getting shot, exiled, held hostage in vienna or haivng their deep seated psychological damage from the russian front being used to manipulate them into betraying the emperor. screen writers get hatemail after murat is shot.

100 DAYS CAMPAIGN 4 HOUR TV MOVIE: all about Ney and his PTSD. poor ney. hugs. he dies at the end and the Marseilles plays mounrfully over the credits which roll up the screen in front of his corpse. everyone cries forever.

im almost serious.

The Hundred Days TV movie would be the death to me.

"screen writers get hatemail after Murat is shot" - that would be me. sorry.

Oh god in a perfect world. Throw in some 2-hour-long Christmas specials such as:

  • Wellesley hacking through the jungles of India. Elephants, rookie mistakes, a drunk night in a sari, SERINGAPATAM
  • Sir John Moore and his Swedish adventure with mad King Gustav, emphasis on the dramatic escape dressed as a peasant
  • The Making of Jean Lannes. Nothing more. Just him. Being devilishly good-looking and fierce

the problem with actually doing this kind of thing right isnt so much the whole thing where you would need THOUSANDS of extras for the battles. Its more that there are SO MANY mid level historical figures we would need to include that we would exhaust the entire reserve of middle aged acting talent in the western world.

further ideas:

a comedy pair of french infantry men who we meet in the first episode and stay along through the entire show as the comic relief with an awesome friendship. they eventually end up in the old guard and in the frist rank over the crest of the ridge at waterloo. guess what happens to them.

DOZENS of awful posh cavalry officers being UTTERLY SHIT at all times and prancing like fools and dueling each other. at least 3 must die per episode. posh cavalry officers are the redshirts of this show. except obviously the redshirts of this show would in fact be the redcoats.

All the marshals being total assholes to each other 24/7

stupid marching song, all the time.

murat fucks dudes.

Wednesday, April 2, 2014
Hemingway and James Joyce were drinking buddies in Paris. Joyce was thin and bespectacled; Hemingway was tall and strapping. When they went out Joyce would get drunk, pick a fight with a bigger guy in the bar and then hide behind Hemingway and yell, “Deal with him, Hemingway. Deal with him.” [x] (via newzerokaneda)

(Source: newzerokannabis)

Monday, March 31, 2014

evayna asked: Abacus watch is cool, but since when is the 17th century 'ancient'?

omg i didn’t read that person’s comment closely enough before reblogging, crolll. 17TH CENTURY IS… NOT ANCIENT. this is like when ppl say the 16th century Maya were an ~ancient civilization.

roachpatrol:

archiemcphee:

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.
Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

oh my god ancient chinese ladies knew where it was at

edited to add: omg, i didn’t notice this post included someone saying the 17th century is “ancient”, i’m dying.

roachpatrol:

archiemcphee:

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.

Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

oh my god ancient chinese ladies knew where it was at

edited to add: omg, i didn’t notice this post included someone saying the 17th century is “ancient”, i’m dying.

Monday, March 24, 2014

free-parking:

i found my new wardrobe

Sunday, March 23, 2014

delibutler asked: I noticed that, amidst your (admittedly interesting) rant, you failed to answer the person's question.

bead-bead:

medievalpoc:

This question, as asked? If you really want a list of people of color “from history” who were neither enslaved nor anyone’s servant…

John Archer, Mayor of Battersea, South London

Black Artists in Europe c. 1800s

Interactive Map on Black Londoners 1800-1900

Black Sailors in the British Navy during the Battle of Trafalgar (video)

Billy Waters and the Black and South Asian Sailors of the British Navy

Paul Cuffee, Ship Owner, Navigator and Abolitionist

Ira Aldridge, Shakespearean Actor in Victorian London

50,000 Free People of Color and Creole people in Louisiana

List of the Monarchs of Hawai’i (with some European Portraits)

Monarchs of Tonga

Monarchy of Fiji

Prime Ministers of Samoa; Malietoa of Samoa

African History from the Dawn of Time

The Kingdom of Ghana

List of Black/African Saints

Mongol Elements in Western Medieval Art

The History of Tunisia (Carthage)

Black Roman Emperor Septimus Severus

List of 50 especially great Black Kings and Queens

Andromeda

Racism and the Rediscovery of Ancient Nubia (“Kush”, from the Christian Bible)

The Kilwa Sultanate of Tanzania

Most of the Egyptian Royalty of ever

All of the rulers from the History of what is now Nigeria

Three Sovereigns and Five Emperors 三皇五帝
Xia Dynasty 夏
Shang Dynasty
Zhou Dynasty 周
Qin Dynasty 秦
Han Dynasty 漢/汉
Three Kingdoms Period 三國/三国
Jin Dynasty 晉/晋
Sixteen Kingdoms Period 十六國/十六国

 Sovereignties established by Wu Hu

Northern and Southern Dynasties 南北朝
Sui Dynasty 隋
Tang Dynasty 唐
Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms 五代十

Independent Regimes during Ten Kingdoms

Liao Dynasty 辽
Song Dynasty 宋
Western Xia 西夏
Jin Dynasty 金
Yuan Dynasty 元
Ming Dynasty 明

Shun Dynasty 順
Southern Ming Dynasty 南明

Qing Dynasty 清

Yuan Shikai’s Empire of China 中華帝國/中华帝国

EGYPT:

Ancient Egypt:

Hellenic Epoch / Ptolemaic Dynasty

Islamic Egypt:

EAST AFRICA

Nubia / Sudan:

Ethiopia:

Zanzibar:

Omani Sultans of Zanzibar

NORTH AFRICA

Algeria:

Libya:

Mauritania:

Morocco:

Tunisia:

Modern Tunisia

WEST AFRICA

Benin:

Ghana:

Mali:

Niger:

Nigeria:

CENTRAL & SOUTH AFRICA

Angola:

Modern Angola

Central Africa:

Chad:

Lesotho:

South Africa:

 Madagascar:

Modern Madagascar

Ghanian Princes as Exchange Students in London

Ayuba Suleiman Diallo, A Man of Learning in London

Sir Morien, Black Knight of the Round Table

Queen Charlotte of Great Britain and Ireland

A Middle-Class Black British Woman

John Moore of York and the Black Freedman of the Tudor Era

Black and South Asian Men of the 19th Century British Navy

Samuel Coleridge Taylor, Composer

Roman Deserters at Hadrian’s Wall

George Augustus Polgreen Bridgetower, Musical Prodigy

Olaudah Equiano, British Abolitionist and Author, Merchant, and Explorer

From Majesty to Mystery-Change in Meanings of Black Madonnas from the 16th to 19th Centuries

Nigra Sum, sed Formosa: The Black Saints in Catholic Tradition

The Madonna and the Cuckoo: An Exploration in European Symbolic Conceptions

The Cult of the Black Virgin

Further Reading/Bibliography:

Can I stop now? Are we good?

Honestly, I’m caught between crying laughing and the sheer level of information, competence and…can lists have sass? Because even before I got to the comment, the SHEER SIZE of the list possessed like, epic levels of sass, GIANT levels of sass, the dry, ordered, gazing-at-you-calmly-while-breaking-your-desk-with-reference-material-and-endng-by gently-overturning-a-box-of-loose-pages-of-information-over-your-head levels of sass, and wanting to get medievalpoc an ice pack and some anti-inflammatories for the amount of typing this work of art called for.  

And a tiara.  Because medievalpoc RULES.

Thursday, March 20, 2014

moniquill:

meridok:

myradish:

aullidodecisne:

hyggehaven:

Chinampa (Nahuatlchināmitl [tʃiˈnaːmitɬ]) is a method of ancient Mesoamerican agriculture which used small, rectangular areas of fertile arable land to grow crops on the shallow lake beds in the Valley of Mexico.

Sometimes referred to as “floating gardens,” chinampas were artificial islands that usually measured roughly 98 ft × 8.2 ft (30 m × 2.5 m).[1] Chinampas were used by the ancient Aztec [Aboriginal Peoples].[2] In Tenochtitlan, the chinampas ranged from 300 ft × 15 ft (91 m × 4.6 m)[1] to 300 ft × 30 ft (91 m × 9.1 m)[1][3] They were created by staking out the shallow lake bed and then fencing in the rectangle with wattle. The fenced-off area was then layered with mud, lake sediment, and decaying vegetation, eventually bringing it above the level of the lake. Often trees such as āhuexōtl [aːˈweːʃoːt͡ɬ] (Salix bonplandiana)[2] (a willow) and āhuēhuētl [aːˈweːweːt͡ɬ] (Taxodium mucronatum)[4] (a cypress) were planted at the corners to secure the chinampa. Chinampas were separated by channels wide enough for a canoe to pass. These “islands” had very high crop yields with up to 7 crops a year.[5]

photo:  Iraun permakultura (1), Aztec Chinampas model by Te Mahi, Photographer: Te Papa, © Te Papa (2)

Chinampas.

Indigenous technology

I love how somehow once its native people like the Aztecs, the 1400s become “ancient”. Cause if I’m not mistaken the chinampas were used into the early 1509s at least. If we were talking about Europeans we’d be saying “medieval” or maybe “Renaissance”.

Meridok’s tags: