Monday, April 23, 2012
"In the third Hunger Games book, there’s a shop that caters to people who take on animal characteristics, the owner herself having had her body augmented to look like a tiger. This is a weird example even by Capitol standards, but when do we see anything even approaching this in the movie? Where’s the extreme plastic surgery? Why are all the women so feminine, and the men dressed in some version of a suit? Where are the goths?" — from Capitol Couture in The Hunger Games.

"In the third Hunger Games book, there’s a shop that caters to people who take on animal characteristics, the owner herself having had her body augmented to look like a tiger. This is a weird example even by Capitol standards, but when do we see anything even approaching this in the movie? Where’s the extreme plastic surgery? Why are all the women so feminine, and the men dressed in some version of a suit? Where are the goths?" — from Capitol Couture in The Hunger Games.

"This isn’t a world of high-end couture fans whose style is dictated by Fashion Week; a far better analogy would be the urban tribes of the Harajuku district in Tokyo. The Harajuku kids dressing in Lolita, Visual Kei and Club Kid styles identify with those subcultures and put a lot of time and effort into the way they look, as should the people of the Capitol. But despite the extravagance of what we see in the Capitol scenes, there’s very little sense that these people are setting out to express their own individuality." — from Capitol Couture in The Hunger Games.

"This isn’t a world of high-end couture fans whose style is dictated by Fashion Week; a far better analogy would be the urban tribes of the Harajuku district in Tokyo. The Harajuku kids dressing in Lolita, Visual Kei and Club Kid styles identify with those subcultures and put a lot of time and effort into the way they look, as should the people of the Capitol. But despite the extravagance of what we see in the Capitol scenes, there’s very little sense that these people are setting out to express their own individuality." — from Capitol Couture in The Hunger Games.

"Fashion is self-expression. It may be molded by trends and designers, but in a culture where everyone has a huge amount of disposable income to spend on self-augmentation and bespoke clothes, everyone should look far more different from one another than they did in the Capitol we saw in the Hunger Games movie." — from Capitol Couture in The Hunger Games.

"Fashion is self-expression. It may be molded by trends and designers, but in a culture where everyone has a huge amount of disposable income to spend on self-augmentation and bespoke clothes, everyone should look far more different from one another than they did in the Capitol we saw in the Hunger Games movie." — from Capitol Couture in The Hunger Games.

Sunday, April 22, 2012
"The reason why the Capitol citizens look the way they do is because they’re part of a society where people are rich, have too much time on their hands, and hugely overvalue personal appearance. Even taking into account the fact that many people are followers rather than trendsetters, the overall effect of the Capitol costumes in the movie is the assumption that colour-matching, dyed hair, puffy sleeves and narrow waists are the Capitol equivalent of jeans-and-a-t-shirt. It removes Effie Trinket’s impact because it characterises her as just another slavish follower of a universal trend. — from Capitol Couture in The Hunger Games.

"The reason why the Capitol citizens look the way they do is because they’re part of a society where people are rich, have too much time on their hands, and hugely overvalue personal appearance. Even taking into account the fact that many people are followers rather than trendsetters, the overall effect of the Capitol costumes in the movie is the assumption that colour-matching, dyed hair, puffy sleeves and narrow waists are the Capitol equivalent of jeans-and-a-t-shirt. It removes Effie Trinket’s impact because it characterises her as just another slavish follower of a universal trend. — from Capitol Couture in The Hunger Games.

Thursday, April 19, 2012 Tuesday, January 24, 2012
"Supposedly this collection was inspired by the New York Dolls  (plus Robert Smith/Joan Jett hair) but I felt it was far more Japanese  thanks to androgynous faux-Victoriana streetstyle outfits like this one." — from Comme des Garçons Menswear, Fall 2012.

"Supposedly this collection was inspired by the New York Dolls (plus Robert Smith/Joan Jett hair) but I felt it was far more Japanese thanks to androgynous faux-Victoriana streetstyle outfits like this one." — from Comme des Garçons Menswear, Fall 2012.