Sunday, October 19, 2014

lohelim:

winterthirst:

sabacc:

Steve Rogers did, in fact, realize that something was off when he saw the outline of the woman’s odd bra (a push-up bra, he would later learn), but being an officer and a gentleman, he said that it was the game that gave the future away.

 (via)

No, see, this scene is just amazing. The costume department deserves so many kudos for this, it’s unreal, especially given the fact that they pulled off Peggy pretty much flawlessly.

1) Her hair is completely wrong for the 40’s. No professional/working woman  would have her hair loose like that. Since they’re trying to pass this off as a military hospital, Steve would know that she would at least have her hair carefully pulled back, if maybe not in the elaborate coiffures that would have been popular.

2) Her tie? Too wide, too long. That’s a man’s tie, not a woman’s. They did, however, get the knot correct as far as I can see - that looks like a Windsor.

3) That. Bra. There is so much clashing between that bra and what Steve would expect (remember, he worked with a bunch of women for a long time) that it has to be intentional. She’s wearing a foam cup, which would have been unheard of back then. It’s also an exceptionally old or ill-fitting bra - why else can you see the tops of the cups? No woman would have been caught dead with misbehaving lingerie like that back then, and the soft satin cups of 40’s lingerie made it nearly impossible anyway. Her breasts are also sitting at a much lower angle than would be acceptable in the 40’s.

Look at his eyes. He knows by the time he gets to her hair that something is very, very wrong.

Friday, October 10, 2014

dtysen-etc:

artofkazumakaneko:

Rediscovering my favorite Kaneko artworks for Maken X.

I’ve no idea what this thing is but their character designer is something special all right.

Anonymous said: Is your talk on the evolution of superhero costuming going to be taped? I would love to hear/watch it, as I am a fan of your blog, but I am distinctly not in Seattle.

I’m not sure. I originally assumed that the talk wouldn’t be taped, but apparently someone from the Daily Dot will be at the convention with film equipment, so… MAYBE? Either way, I was considering turning it into a series of articles and publishing it either on my blog or (preferably) on whichever website will pay me for it. 

Seattle Geek Girl Con schedule

I’m in Seattle for Geek Girl Con this weekend! I’m doing two panels and a talk about superhero costumes — please come along! :D Here’s my schedule.

SATURDAY

3pm: “21st Century Boys: Slash in the Mainstream”

Today, male/male slash is the predominant form of ‘shipping in online fandom. Growth of slash and femslash has spawned new problems: exploitation of ‘shipping by media; the push to make fanfic “publishable”; and the ongoing struggle to translate fandom’s feminism, diversity, and push for queer pairings into increased media representation.”

5pm: “Fandom and the Media”

This panel is basically me and several other fandom/geek culture journalists (Lauren Orsini, Aja Romano, Versha Sharma, Lisa Granshaw and Amanda Brennan) discussing our experiences in the field, and talking about what it’s like to report on fandom news when you yourself are a fan.

SUNDAY

3pm: “Evolution of the Superhero Movie Costume”

I’m doing a 45-minute talk about how superhero movie costumes have developed over the years, and why. If you like my HelloTailor blog posts about superhero movies, hopefully you’ll enjoy this! 

(P.S. Unrelated to the above panels, but if you’re at GGC and you like the idea of a free ARC of A Hero At The End Of The Worldnonmodernist​ has a couple to give away!)

Wednesday, October 8, 2014 Friday, October 3, 2014

fuckyeahilike said: My curiosity burns with the strength of a thousand suns over what you think of Margot Verger's astounding wardrobe in Hannibal. Do you intend to review it eventually? Even if you don't have the time or the inclination to do a lengthy article about the whole show and its characters, surelly that one deserves some comments! :) Thanks!

I don’t think I ever got round to writing about Margot Verger, but I have written about the costumes of Hannibal in general. Part 1 of my Hannibal costume blog series is here.

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Costume design in CATWS: Nick Fury, Black Widow, and SHIELD.
In the MCU, S.H.I.E.L.D. is portrayed as a quasi-governmental Men in Black organization. It’s mostly populated by military types, agents like Coulson, jumpsuit-wearing Helicarrier personnel, and a smattering of individuals like Black Widow and Hawkeye. Fury is in charge, with Maria Hill as the deputy director and Alexander Pierce as his immediate superior, a kind of liaison between S.H.I.E.L.D. and various world governments.Up until Captain America: The Winter Soldier Fury had been the authority figure, a character who swoops in and solves problems or tells characters what to do. He was basically a trigger-happy, morally ambiguous Gandalf figure.CATWS introduced a much-needed new dimension of fallibility to Nick Fury, as well as showing him inside S.H.I.E.L.D. headquarters for the first time. Alexander Pierce, in his old-fashioned but stylish three-piece suits, both fits in with those surroundings and represents the political establishment. Meanwhile Fury, with his ostentatious black leather outfits, does not exactly seem like he belongs inside a grey office building.
[READ MORE]

Costume design in CATWS: Nick Fury, Black Widow, and SHIELD.

In the MCU, S.H.I.E.L.D. is portrayed as a quasi-governmental Men in Black organization. It’s mostly populated by military types, agents like Coulson, jumpsuit-wearing Helicarrier personnel, and a smattering of individuals like Black Widow and Hawkeye. Fury is in charge, with Maria Hill as the deputy director and Alexander Pierce as his immediate superior, a kind of liaison between S.H.I.E.L.D. and various world governments.

Up until Captain America: The Winter Soldier Fury had been the authority figure, a character who swoops in and solves problems or tells characters what to do. He was basically a trigger-happy, morally ambiguous Gandalf figure.

CATWS introduced a much-needed new dimension of fallibility to Nick Fury, as well as showing him inside S.H.I.E.L.D. headquarters for the first time. Alexander Pierce, in his old-fashioned but stylish three-piece suits, both fits in with those surroundings and represents the political establishment. Meanwhile Fury, with his ostentatious black leather outfits, does not exactly seem like he belongs inside a grey office building.

[READ MORE]

Costume design in CATWS: Nick Fury, Black Widow, and SHIELD.

Marvel Studios obviously had to keep Back Widow’s red hair for the movies, but instead of going for a natural shade like Pepper Potts, they went for a bright red tone that could only come from a bottle. That’s where my comparison with Nick Fury comes in. I think that Black Widow purposefully dyes her hair such a noticeable shade because it then becomes her defining feature.

The result? As soon as she changes her hair colour to something else, she can easily slip under the radar. A reverse disguise like Nick Fury’s carefully constructed image as a leather-wearing badass, which allowed him to disappear just by putting on a hoodie and sunglasses instead.

[READ MORE]

Monday, September 22, 2014

Costume design in CATWS: Nick Fury, Black Widow, and SHIELD.

Aside from being totally goth, Fury’s outfits have one major thing in common: they’re menacing. The softest, most casual thing we ever see him wear is a dark grey cardigan when he’s hospitalized after faking his death, and even then he’s wearing it with some sort of bespoke leather sling that looks like a holster.

Nick Fury’s badass black outfits make him into a visually iconic figure, even within the movie itself. This has the effect of a kind of reverse disguise because as soon as he takes off his signature Nick Fury Costume, it’s very easy for him to disappear. When people are expecting a big, imposing figure in a sweeping black coat and eyepatch, they’re not going to be looking for an elderly man in a hoodie and sunglasses.

[READ MORE]

Costume design in CATWS: Nick Fury, Black Widow, and SHIELD.

There’s a certain internal consistency to the costumes at S.H.I.E.L.D., with Maria Hill and most of the Helicarrier personnel wearing navy blue uniforms (the same shade as Cap’s new uniform and his nylon biker jacket in this movie, incidentally), and characters like Coulson and Agent 13 wearing subdued businesswear.

Nick Fury does not fall into either category. He’s sure as hell not wearing normal clothes that could blend into his surroundings, and I highly doubt that his outfits adhere to S.H.I.E.L.D.’s official uniform. Instead, I can only describe his favourite costume as some kind of supervillain-themed black leather cosplay outfit.

Yes, Nick Fury is a goth.

[READ MORE]