Monday, July 28, 2014
During the packed panel at San Diego Comic-Con, the Saga writer noted that while today, Joss Whedon and George R.R. Martin are considered cultural monsters for killing off beloved characters, death used to be a more common feature of popular fiction. One problem, he believes, is that too many characters live in the hands of corporations and are therefore considered too precious to kill. Vaughn feels that takes away one of the things that makes fiction so valuable. Brian K. Vaughn And Fiona Staples Reveal What’s Ahead For Saga (via wilwheaton)

On Wonder Woman and Heeled Boots

dcwomenkickingass:

Yesterday Warner Bros. revealed the costume Gal Gadot will wear for her role in Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice.

The costume has her wearing boots. I don’t care for the inclusion of boots. Yes, she’s been drawn wearing heeled boots (including her first appearance)

image

but she’s also been drawn wearing greek sandals

image

and boots with no heel.

image

So there is no continuity over the last 70 plus years although there certainly has been some rethinking of how female characters are presented in media during that time. 

A few years ago when they were making the disastrous NBC pilot they also had Wonder Woman wearing a heel. Here’s what I said then:

Wonder Woman is free of vanity. For her a costume should be utilitarian — to cover what needs be covered and to make her recognizable to scare off weak-willed adversaries and alert others to her involvement. 

Having heels on her boots adds nothing. A boot heel will not make her run faster or kick harder or assist her in doing her job or make her recognizable. The only thing a heel does is please the eye. And that is something Wonder Woman should not care about.

A few folks have stated the heel is required to give her the height to stand with her co-stars Affleck and Cavill. That also does not require a costume with a heel as we’ve seen from dozens of films starring actors who are shorter than their female co-stars.

This is not about hating high heeled boots; I love high heeled boots. It’s fine if Wonder Woman wore them in her “civilian” identity. Rather, this is about questioning a costuming choice which puts the emphasis on Hollywood’s requirements for a Woman rather than the Wonder of the character.

Saturday, July 26, 2014

theladymonsters:

nothingbutacheat:

when people headcanons that black widow can pick up mjolnit I’m just like ???????? like lets take a look at who canonically can pick up mjolnir:

  • thor
  • steve rogers
  • wonder woman

there’s a pattern going on between these people, natasha doean’t fit in it.

do you hear that boom

image

that is the sound of how wrong you are

Friday, July 25, 2014
gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?
Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.
So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”
All hands went up.
"How many of you want to make comics some day?"
Most of the hands went up.
Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”
Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”
"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.
She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”
That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.
It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.
The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?

Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.

So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”

All hands went up.

"How many of you want to make comics some day?"

Most of the hands went up.

Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”

Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”

"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.

She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”

That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.

It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.

The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

Wednesday, July 23, 2014
I don’t want to go so far as to say that only a white writer would think to have Sam Wilson become Captain America, because that’s not the case. I do, however, think that only a writer who isn’t trying hard enough would come up with that already-been-done story. More important, I think only a writer caught up in existing racial ideologies would think it is a good idea that a black man assumes the identity of a white man, as if that is the pinnacle of identity.

Let me be clear, so there is no misunderstanding, any writer working in comics could have come up with the idea of Falcon taking over for Captain America. It is a no-brainer. What is troubling to me—and is something that I’ve talked about before—is that in his forty-plus year history, Falcon has no truly defining story. Even the best Falcon stories are either mediocre or forgettable, and now, after all this time, the character gets to do something memorable by taking over the job of a white guy. This is the real reason why Marvel’s Diversity & Representation 2014 initiative is such a joke. It is all superficial (not to mention temporary), and it only perpetuates the notion that in order for people of color and women to achieve greatness, they must literally fill the shoes of a white man. Gimme a break.
David Walker at BadAzzMofo (via the fray newsletter )

(Source: quigonejinn)

kitsparrow:

ghettocarnival:

PETER

PETER.

(Source: dickpuns)

Tuesday, July 22, 2014
johndarnielle:

giraffepoliceforce:

Still pretty proud of my response to this.

I loved Marvel comics when I was a kid; I was a weird kid who didn’t get down with macho stuff, in part because of the general scene in my house & in part because I was scrawny and couldn’t really front like I was tough. In my tiny limited-to-my-personal-friends-and-surroundings comics scene, the idea that macho norm-enforcer types could be into comics would have come as a huge and deeply disappointing surprise; comics, in my mind, were for people who’d already begun to sense that, in the immortal words of Anti-Flag, “their system doesn’t work for you.”
I hope Marvel systematically “ruins” absolutely every one of their legacy characters forever, one after another, and then D.C. runs a Sgt. Rock miniseries where he renounces violence as a means of conflict resolution. May the grousing of the macho comics dudes ascend to Heaven forever and make an acceptable sacrifice unto Galactus

johndarnielle:

giraffepoliceforce:

Still pretty proud of my response to this.

I loved Marvel comics when I was a kid; I was a weird kid who didn’t get down with macho stuff, in part because of the general scene in my house & in part because I was scrawny and couldn’t really front like I was tough. In my tiny limited-to-my-personal-friends-and-surroundings comics scene, the idea that macho norm-enforcer types could be into comics would have come as a huge and deeply disappointing surprise; comics, in my mind, were for people who’d already begun to sense that, in the immortal words of Anti-Flag, “their system doesn’t work for you.”

I hope Marvel systematically “ruins” absolutely every one of their legacy characters forever, one after another, and then D.C. runs a Sgt. Rock miniseries where he renounces violence as a means of conflict resolution. May the grousing of the macho comics dudes ascend to Heaven forever and make an acceptable sacrifice unto Galactus

agentmlovestacos:

Doctor Strange and Reed Richards, totally best friends forever. #twimurc #comics #marvel

agentmlovestacos:

Doctor Strange and Reed Richards, totally best friends forever. #twimurc #comics #marvel

Monday, July 21, 2014

postcardsfromspace:

postcardsfromspace:

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN, ALISON MOTHERFUCKING BLAIRE

Yeaaaaaaaaaaaaah

Friday, July 11, 2014
fursasaida:

scifigrl47:

historymiss:

brothasoul:

blacksupervillain:

invisiblelad:

northstarfan:

gamoradorable:

i don’t even know what to say to this

While implying that things are better when people don’t think critically about what they read is clearly the mark of a free and enlightened society.

Critical thinking is bad and might be fascist. I could have sworn I saw that one on Fox News. 

what is happening today?

it is apparently time for comics writers to rally against their fans again

Nice use of scare quotes there, ‘Brubaker’.

(slow, sarcastic clapping) No, no. The GOVERNMENT telling writers what they are allowed to write, often under the threat of imprisonment, torture, or death, is how that ‘worked.’ The READERSHIP saying ‘we do not like what you’ve written, and we are not interested in paying for it or anything else you’ve written, and we are encouraging your current employer to replace you with someone who can do the job better, because we consume their product, you goddamn HACK’ is how CAPITALISM works. I know it’s confusing, but they’re a little different.
And is he really doing this? Are we really comparing the threat placed on legitimate journalists and authors under a violent dictatorship or regime to the fan lead efforts to get a 3rd rate, misogynistic HACK removed from a flagship title? A flagship comic book title whose circulation numbers that he has driven into the ground? That’s… What we’re doing here.
Gotta say. I’m a little ‘outraged’ by his comparison.

It’s amazing to me how I see this argument over and over and over again, specifically when it comes to media representation/narrative criticism—not just from creators but from consumers who don’t want to be bothered. Because what it reveals is that these people think the discomfort they experience when confronted with these arguments is literally equivalent to institutional violence. 

fursasaida:

scifigrl47:

historymiss:

brothasoul:

blacksupervillain:

invisiblelad:

northstarfan:

gamoradorable:

i don’t even know what to say to this

While implying that things are better when people don’t think critically about what they read is clearly the mark of a free and enlightened society.

Critical thinking is bad and might be fascist. I could have sworn I saw that one on Fox News. 

what is happening today?

it is apparently time for comics writers to rally against their fans again

Nice use of scare quotes there, ‘Brubaker’.

(slow, sarcastic clapping) No, no. The GOVERNMENT telling writers what they are allowed to write, often under the threat of imprisonment, torture, or death, is how that ‘worked.’ The READERSHIP saying ‘we do not like what you’ve written, and we are not interested in paying for it or anything else you’ve written, and we are encouraging your current employer to replace you with someone who can do the job better, because we consume their product, you goddamn HACK’ is how CAPITALISM works. I know it’s confusing, but they’re a little different.

And is he really doing this? Are we really comparing the threat placed on legitimate journalists and authors under a violent dictatorship or regime to the fan lead efforts to get a 3rd rate, misogynistic HACK removed from a flagship title? A flagship comic book title whose circulation numbers that he has driven into the ground? That’s… What we’re doing here.

Gotta say. I’m a little ‘outraged’ by his comparison.

It’s amazing to me how I see this argument over and over and over again, specifically when it comes to media representation/narrative criticism—not just from creators but from consumers who don’t want to be bothered. Because what it reveals is that these people think the discomfort they experience when confronted with these arguments is literally equivalent to institutional violence