Thursday, April 24, 2014
The girl’s parents were informed of the situation. Shouldn’t it ultimately be their responsibility?"

- Sac Anime director Dan Houck’s response to the question I posed to him: “in addition to protecting the child and alerting her parents, why did Sac Anime not alert BABSCon staff that there was a reported predator at their con so they could prevent him from harming any one else?

11-year-old girl allegedly harassed and stalked at a Brony con; was it the responsibility of this anime con staff to do more?

What do you do when a child comes to you begging for help, claiming she’s being stalked by a stranger?

The response to that exact scenario by one group of convention staffers this weekend has enraged and polarized a fandom, driven one convention staffer offline in a wave of harassment, and led to a clash between two regional conventions.

It has not, however, led to any consequences for the man who may have been stalking and harassing an 11-year-old girl while dressed as a Brony.

[READ MORE]

(via bookshop)

"RACIST??? LOLOLOL!!!" — Avril Lavigne denies accusations that her new music video exploits Japanese culture.

Featuring four expressionless Japanese backup dancers, a watered-down Kyary Pamyu Pamyu aesthetic and liberal (and nonsensical) use of the word “kawaii,” the song and video have been widely criticized for being an embarrassing example of racial and cultural exploitation.

It only took a few hours for Lavigne to respond on Facebook and Twitter, with a message that began, “RACIST??? LOLOLOL!!!”

The video was pulled from YouTube hours after it posted amid a high volume of negative comments, but it now appears to be viewable on Vevo’s YouTube channel. It’s pretty clear from her reactions on social media that Lavigne doesn’t really understand why people are accusing the video of being racist—or, perhaps, that she is pretending not to understand. “I love Japanese culture,” is the same defense offered by every tweenage Japanophile in the Western world, and it doesn’t actually preclude racial insensitivity or cultural appropriation.

[READ MORE]

helenish:

filmhabits:

WolfCop - Poster
In theaters June 6, 2014

This is how Derek Hale gets arrested, AGAIN, protesting outside the Beacon Hills movie theater with a sign he made that says: REPRESENTATION, NOT EXPLOITATION. Or—that’s not how he gets arrested. He’s out there for most of opening weekend, wearing various sweaters in cosy colors. He has some pamphlets, if people are interested. He dutifully explains to people who say, look, the werewolf is the HERO in the movie, what’s the problem? Again and again. No actual werewolves were involved in this movie in any way—that would have been a good start. It doesn’t matter if he’s the hero if the movie still portrays being a werewolf as a freakish, terrifying, disgusting thing that happens to your body instead of a core part of your identity. This movie is lurid fetishization dressed up as progress. Here’s a list of independent werewolf films if you’re interested. 
How he gets arrested is that Isaac shows up late on Saturday night, takes one look at the college kids laughing at Derek while he talks to an NPR-Mom, and leans in and snatches their tickets out of their hands, rips them in half. 
"Don’t worry about it, you can still see a werewolf," he snarls, grabbing one of them by the shirtfront, fangs dropping. Derek pulls him off, but not before he clocks one of them pretty good. They both spend the night in jail. 
NPR-mom testifies at the trial. Derek is cleared. Isaac gets community service and discovers his talents at teaching toddlers gymnastics at the local Boys and Girls Club. The makers of Wolf Cop issue a formal apology. Claw and Order, a gritty crime drama where most of the wolf characters are played by real werewolves and they have a werewolf script advisor, debuts on HBO with record-breaking ratings. Derek has it on his DVR but is 13 episodes behind because it’s intense and sometimes really sad.
Pack + 1 is on ABC at 8:00 on Fridays; it’s an hour-long family dramedy about a dysfunctional pack and their reluctant emissary, who learn lessons about love and trust after taking in an orphaned wolf pup. Derek watches it live and then downloads it from Itunes and also he bought the soundtrack for season 1, but that’s because it’s important to show support, he says, it’s not—it’s just—it’s a kid’s show, but—but. It’s pretty well written, he mutters.
Change begins at home. 

PERFECTION.

helenish:

filmhabits:

WolfCop - Poster

In theaters June 6, 2014

This is how Derek Hale gets arrested, AGAIN, protesting outside the Beacon Hills movie theater with a sign he made that says: REPRESENTATION, NOT EXPLOITATION. Or—that’s not how he gets arrested. He’s out there for most of opening weekend, wearing various sweaters in cosy colors. He has some pamphlets, if people are interested. He dutifully explains to people who say, look, the werewolf is the HERO in the movie, what’s the problem? Again and again. No actual werewolves were involved in this movie in any way—that would have been a good start. It doesn’t matter if he’s the hero if the movie still portrays being a werewolf as a freakish, terrifying, disgusting thing that happens to your body instead of a core part of your identity. This movie is lurid fetishization dressed up as progress. Here’s a list of independent werewolf films if you’re interested. 

How he gets arrested is that Isaac shows up late on Saturday night, takes one look at the college kids laughing at Derek while he talks to an NPR-Mom, and leans in and snatches their tickets out of their hands, rips them in half.

"Don’t worry about it, you can still see a werewolf," he snarls, grabbing one of them by the shirtfront, fangs dropping. Derek pulls him off, but not before he clocks one of them pretty good. They both spend the night in jail. 

NPR-mom testifies at the trial. Derek is cleared. Isaac gets community service and discovers his talents at teaching toddlers gymnastics at the local Boys and Girls Club. The makers of Wolf Cop issue a formal apology. Claw and Order, a gritty crime drama where most of the wolf characters are played by real werewolves and they have a werewolf script advisor, debuts on HBO with record-breaking ratings. Derek has it on his DVR but is 13 episodes behind because it’s intense and sometimes really sad.

Pack + 1 is on ABC at 8:00 on Fridays; it’s an hour-long family dramedy about a dysfunctional pack and their reluctant emissary, who learn lessons about love and trust after taking in an orphaned wolf pup. Derek watches it live and then downloads it from Itunes and also he bought the soundtrack for season 1, but that’s because it’s important to show support, he says, it’s not—it’s just—it’s a kid’s show, but—but. It’s pretty well written, he mutters.

Change begins at home. 

PERFECTION.

thelindsaytuggey:

Do you have a shorter name?

Every time I watch the movie (which is probably way too much), I swoon a bit when Bruce Willis says, “LeeLoo” like it’s the most beautiful name he’s ever heard.

(Source: brusewillis)

cthonical:

wild-lion:

i think my saddest moment as an Australian was finding out that the rest of the world doesn’t say “never eat soggy weetbix” to figure out the order of the compass

how even does the rest of the world remember this

"never eat shredded wheat" rhymes better. (that’s the british version afaik.)

(Source: annnica)

jaegerlicioustwilightprincess:

paul4allseasons:

Female Titan Makeup by Florea Flavia

This is the best female titan cosplay I’ve ever seen.

magnusatom:

The artists over at Pictoplasma academy are producing some pretty amazing stuff.

sjmillerart:

haughty prince sketch

sjmillerart:

haughty prince sketch