Monday, September 1, 2014

(Source: supermodelgif)

thatrapscallionsponge:

gingerche:

yourscientistfriend:

Ferguson

today

Guys, just because it’s out of the mainstream media doesn’t mean that the problems are gone. We gotta keep giving attention to these issues

neptunain:

honeymoon is an interesting term because an actual moon made of honey would imply space bees which is pretty horrifying

notordinaryfashion:

Alexander McQueen @ Givenchy Haute Couture F/W 1997

notordinaryfashion:

Alexander McQueen @ Givenchy Haute Couture F/W 1997

spacebromance:

"Everyone knows this."

seaghostsoaring:

Sebastian Droste (1892-1927) was a poet, actor and dancer connected with the gay and underworld subcultures of Berlin in the 1920s. In 1922, Droste married expressionist exotic dancer and actress in German silent movies, Anita Berber (1899–1928). Scandalously androgynous, she wore heavy dancer’s make-up, which on the black-and-white photos and films of the time came across as jet black lipstick painted across the heart-shaped part of her skinny lips, and charcoaled eyes. Her performances broke boundaries with their androgyny and total nudity, but it was her public appearances that really challenged taboos. Berber’s overt drug addiction and bisexuality were matters of public chatter. In addition to her addiction to cocaine, opium and morphine, one of Berber’s favourites was chloroform and ether mixed in a bowl. This would be stirred with a white rose, the petals of which she would then eat

seaghostsoaring:

Sebastian Droste (1892-1927) was a poet, actor and dancer connected with the gay and underworld subcultures of Berlin in the 1920s. In 1922, Droste married expressionist exotic dancer and actress in German silent movies, Anita Berber (1899–1928). Scandalously androgynous, she wore heavy dancer’s make-up, which on the black-and-white photos and films of the time came across as jet black lipstick painted across the heart-shaped part of her skinny lips, and charcoaled eyes.

Her performances broke boundaries with their androgyny and total nudity, but it was her public appearances that really challenged taboos. Berber’s overt drug addiction and bisexuality were matters of public chatter. In addition to her addiction to cocaine, opium and morphine, one of Berber’s favourites was chloroform and ether mixed in a bowl. This would be stirred with a white rose, the petals of which she would then eat

Clara, the Twelfth Doctor, and female characters during the Moffat era of Doctor Who.

Regarding Doctor Who's increasingly dubious relationship with its female characters, I have mixed feelings about Clara's tenure on the show. Her characterization last season was practically nonexistent, but season 8 seems far more promising.

Unfortunately, I have problems with this new running “joke” where the Doctor makes fun of Clara’s appearance, because it’s just so… pointless and mean? In the space of two episodes, the Doctor has called Clara “short and mannish,” mocked her for caring too much about her appearance, told her that she was “built like a man,” and commented that she looked tired and it was good that she was “still making an effort.” Steven Moffat really is weirdly obsessed with the attractiveness of his female characters.

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thegenuflector said: Who do you reckon is the best dressed person so far in the MCU?

i think black widow has the most potential to be “best dressed” because she’s so good at disguises, but i suspect her personal taste is probably more like “comfortable and blends into a crowd.”

there are a lot of characters in the MCU now, but as far as i remember the best dressed is either pepper potts or loki (or possibly frigga). pepper clearly has a lot of interest in fashion, and a bank balance to back it up. loki is vain, has shapeshifting powers and wears a lot of sparkly armour, BUT the armour we see him wearing is probably ~official prince armour~ or something, whereas frigga’s clothes are more like really expensive, classy, formal asgardian gowns. so i’m stuck between those three characters, i think.

Anonymous said: I'm a college student interested in becoming an editor. Right now my major is English. If you have any knowledge you could share with me, what do you think would best prepare me to go into the editing field? I'm mostly interesting in becoming a book editor.

You should ask the careers advice service at your college about this, and look online for career guides from within the publishing industry. Also, look for internships.

Anonymous said: I'm a professional-type person in my mid-20s and would never confess to anyone I know that I read fanfiction, because of the inevitable stigma (it's like porn, but with emotions for teenage girls which is FUCKED up but not a hill I care to die on). I don't see you have trouble with any of that--your real name is attached to this blog, and you've made a career out of it with Big Bang Press. Do you just not encounter that, or do you have a specific way of brushing off the haters?

i’ve never really experienced any stigma attached to fandom. like, i was a relatively nerdy teen, but all of my friends knew about fanfic because Harry Potter and the LOTR movies came out while we were in high school. my parents were aware of my fandom hobbies and their only real objection was “why don’t you spend more time studying.” then as an adult, people either know about fanfic already, or they find the idea interesting when i tell them about Big Bang Press, or it just doesn’t come up in conversation. if it comes up, it comes up, you know? and it’s highly unlikely to come up in a conversation with your 40-year-old male boss, or whatever.

obviously this kind of thing is dependent on your surroundings, though. i’m lucky to have built a career around fan culture, and to have friends who don’t find that weird. but even when i was working in totally everyday jobs, there were still people there who read fanfic or used tumblr or whatever. it’s pretty mainstream now. for example, in my last call centre job i sat next to a guy who wrote pokemon fanfic (or maybe it was transformers, i can’t remember), and he just brought it up in conversation organically.